Expectations for students

Expectations for students is an umbrella term that links learning outcomes with annotated examples of student work in the subject or short course specification. When teachers, students or parents looking at the online specification scroll through the learning outcomes, a link will sometimes be available to examples of work associated with a specific learning outcome or with a group of learning outcomes. The examples of student work will have been selected to illustrate expectations and will have been annotated by teachers. The examples will include work that is:

  • exceptional
  • above expectations
  • in line with expectations.

The purpose of the examples of student work is to show the extent to which the learning outcomes are being realised in actual cases. 

Learning outcomes
Learning outcomes are statements that describe what knowledge, understanding, skills and values students should be able to demonstrate having studied Classics in junior cycle. The learning outcomes set out in the following tables apply to all students. As set out here they represent outcomes for students at the end of their three years of study. The specification stresses that the learning outcomes are for three years and therefore the learning outcomes focused on at a point in time will not have been ‘completed’ but will continue to support the students’ learning in classics up to the end of junior cycle. 
To support the exploration of the learning outcomes by teachers, parents and students, a glossary of the action verbs used in the specification is included in Appendix A. The outcomes are numbered within each strand. The numbering is intended to support teacher planning in the first instance and does not imply any hierarchy of importance across the outcomes themselves, nor does it suggest an order to which the learning outcomes should be developed in class. Junior cycle Classics is offered at a common level. The examples of student work linked to learning outcomes will offer commentary and insights that support differentiation and inclusive classroom practices. 
 

Strand 1: Core component: Myth

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Reading narratives and exploring representations
  1. 1.1

    create a visual representation of a myth that captures their favourite theme, motif or message and share this with their classmates

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  2. 1.2

    investigate how gods/goddesses and heroes/heroines are represented in visual sources

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  3. 1.3

    examine the storytelling techniques and conventions of plot and character development used in mythical stories 

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  4. 1.4

    act as a storyteller by retelling myths in their own words using appropriate vocabulary and style

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  5. 1.5

    collaborate with their classmates to create a myth or story, considering the appropriate conventions and the messages to be conveyed 

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2. Analysing structures, patterns, values and ideologies
  1. 1.6

    explore the motifs, themes, values and messages of myths

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  2. 1.7

    discuss the attitudes towards gender and sexual norms that myths reflect

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  3. 1.8

    select central and favourite moments from myths, and evaluate characters’ decisions and actions at those moments

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  4. 1.9

    recognise that there are different versions of myths and explore the reasons for these differences 

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  5. 1.10

    recognise and explain expressions associated with Greek and Roman myths and use these appropriately in other contexts (for example, Achilles heel, Pandora’s box)

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Strand 1: Core component: Daily life

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Reading narratives and exploring representations
  1. 1.11

    examine the daily life of a young person living in the ancient world and compare this with the life of a young person today (for example, education, recreational activities, friendships)

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  2. 1.12

    examine what we can learn from archaeological and visual evidence about daily life in the ancient world 

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  3. 1.13

    create a visual representation of a Greek or Roman home describing the functions of the various rooms and areas

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  4. 1.14

    collaborate with their classmates to examine a selected occupation in the ancient world (for example a farmer, priestess, teacher, soldier, sailor or midwife) 

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  5. 1.15

    explore the experience of individuals of different social status in Greek and Roman society (for example male and female, citizen and non-citizen, free and slave, wealthy and poor)

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2. Analysing structures, patterns, values and ideologies
  1. 1.16

    investigate common religious beliefs, practices and daily rituals, considering their purpose and how they were experienced

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  2. 1.17

    explore the rules, duties and relationships in Greek , Roman and modern households

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  3. 1.18

    collaborate with their classmates to recreate an aspect of daily life in the ancient world (for example, dining, playing, praying, attending an event or going to school) 

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  4. 1.19

    discuss the difference between the relationships and behaviour of gods/goddesses and humans in myths and the norms and expectations of daily life in the ancient world

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  5. 1.20

    recognise and explain common Greek and Latin terms associated with daily life and their modern derivations (for example, domus, familia, oikos, paterfamilias)

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Strand 2: Classical studies component: The world of Achilles

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Reading narratives and exploring representations
  1. 2.1

    explain the mythological background to the Trojan War 

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  2. 2.2

    illustrate, with examples, poetic devices and techniques that are characteristic of epic poetry (for example, epithets, similes, digressions, repetition)

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  3. 2.3

    identify key sites associated with the Iliad and its historical background on a map

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  4. 2.4

    create a portfolio of key characters in the Iliad in collaboration with their classmates

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  5. 2.5

    investigate how characters from the Iliad are represented in visual sources (for example ancient vases and sculpture, modern paintings and films)

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  6. 2.6

    compare the Iliad’s depiction of heroes with the depiction of non-combatants affected by the Trojan War (for example, parents, women and servants)

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2. Analysing structures, patterns, values and ideologies
  1. 2.7

    evaluate Achilles’ decisions and actions in comparison with the decisions and actions of other heroes in the Iliad

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  2. 2.8

    recognise and explain common Greek concepts and words associated with Homeric epic (for example, timé, kleos, aidós, areté, pathos)

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  3. 2.9

    examine the relationship between gods/goddesses and mortals in the Iliad

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  4. 2.10

    create a code of honour for modern day heroes/heroines with reference to the Homeric code

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  5. 2.11

    discuss other ancient sources that deal with anger (for example, Aristotle, Plutarch, Seneca) in relation to the Iliad’s engagement with this emotion

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Strand 2: Classical studies component: Rome, centre of an empire

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Reading narratives and exploring representations
  1. 2.12

    identify types of Roman public architecture (for example, aqueduct, triumphal arch, amphitheatre, baths)

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  2. 2.13

    examine the functions and uses of three chosen buildings, structures or public spaces 

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  3. 2.14

    imagine themselves at an event or activity associated with each of the three selected locations, commenting on what is happening and why, and who is present 

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  4. 2.15

    collaborate with their classmates to create a representation of their favourite Roman building, structure or site 

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  5. 2.16

    recognise and explain common terms associated with Roman architecture (for example, thermae, portico, capital, aqueduct, dome)

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2. Analysing structures, patterns, values and ideologies
  1. 2.17

    explore Roman history, society and public life through public buildings, structures and spaces 

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  2. 2.18

    investigate the careers and political goals of the historical figures who commissioned the chosen buildings, structures or spaces 

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  3. 2.19

    compare a building in their local area with a building in Rome 

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  4. 2.20

    debate the usefulness and limitations of different types of historical sources (for example, art, architecture, inscriptions and literature)

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Strand 3: Classical language component

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Reading narratives and exploring representations
  1. 3.1

    recognise the meaning of frequently-used words and phrases 

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  2. 3.2

    interpret the general sense of a text on familiar topics 

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  3. 3.3

    identify specific information in texts on familiar topics

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  4. 3.4

    discuss original literary texts with their classmates 

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  5. 3.5

    independently create accurate translations of sentences and passages of limited complexity on familiar topics, annotated and adapted as appropriate 

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  6. 3.6

    pronounce words, phrases and simple sentences accurately enough to be understood, with appropriate intonation

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  7. 3.7

    recognise (in listening), frequently-used words and phrases related to areas of immediate relevance and experience 

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  8. 3.8

    explore vocabulary and grammatical rules by writing, completing and transforming phrases and simple sentences

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  9. 3.9

    examine what we can learn from the language about the social roles, conventions and values of daily life

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  10. 3.10

    identify and explore with their classmates the language resources available through a range of media 

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2. Analysing structures, patterns, values and ideologies
  1. 3.11

    recognise, describe and use language patterns such as word types, inflection, grammatical functions, word order, spelling and punctuation conventions

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  2. 3.12

    explain the logical reasoning that led them to a specific interpretation of a phrase or sentence 

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  3. 3.13

    deduce the meaning of unfamiliar words and word forms by relating them to words and word forms they know and the context in which they occur

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  4. 3.14

    recognise how word choice, syntax, grammar and text structure may vary with genre, purpose and context, and may also change over time

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  5. 3.15

    compare the vocabulary and grammar of the target language with that of other languages they know, making connections and distinctions as appropriate 

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  6. 3.16

    investigate the etymology of words in modern languages which are derived from Latin or Ancient Greek

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  7. 3.17

    monitor and assess their own language confidence and language-learning strategies, using feedback to reflect on what they need to improve and to set goals for improvement 

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  8. 3.18

    collaborate with their classmates to create language learning resources and share these

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